Traffic Incident Management PPT 1 (2022)

National

Traffic Incident Management (TIM)

Responder Training Program

LAW ENFORCEMENT | FIRE | EMS | TRANSPORTATION

TOWING & RECOVERY | COMMUNICATIONS

Intro: FOTEP/Safety Stand Down 2014

a. Review of 2013

b. PPT of TIMS

c. Table top exercises

d. Apparatus placement drill

Review the handouts and any other materials provided to the students

Responder Struck-By Fatalities

In a typical year, the following number of responders are struck and killed:

  • 12 Law Enforcement Officers
  • 5 Fire and Rescue Personnel
    • 70 killed between 1996-2010
  • 60 Towing and Recovery Professionals

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Lesson 1

According to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial, over the past 24 years, an average of 12 officers are killed each year in struck-by incidents

The National Fallen Firefighters Memorial in Emmitsburg, MD indicated that statistics from 2010 are typical for firefighter struck-by deaths, about 5 per year

The International Towing and Recovery Hall of Fame and Museum in Chattanooga, TN tells us that about 60 tow operators are struck and killed each year

Review from last year

  • Situational Awareness while responding to and returning from a call is paramount
    • 2nd leading cause of FF injury and death
    • Safety Bulletin and SOP on Response and General Scene Safety
  • Situational Awareness on scene
    • Safety Bulletin (High Visibility Vests)
    • SOP for (Accident Scene Safety)
    • Skill Sheet (MVA Scene Safety)

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Its important to remember

Backing Review

  • Backing Policy
  • Safety Bulletin (Two Spotters)
  • SOP

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Move It or Work It?

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Move It: This refers to moving vehicles involved in an incident to a secondary location before being worked

Work It: This refers to a situation where the vehicles involved cannot be moved to a secondary location before being worked

Lesson 4

The windshield size-up upon your arrival sets the stage for early decisions that are made at traffic incidents

Every time you arrive at an incident scene, you have to make a choice to either Move It or to Work It

Move It: This refers to moving vehicles involved in an incident to a secondary location before being worked

Work It: This refers to a situation where the vehicles involved cannot be moved to a secondary location before being worked

Lane Designation Terminology
– Recommended Lane Numbering

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HOV Lane

Lane 1

Lane 2

Lane 3

Lane 4

Lesson 2

Note that a special or unique use lane, such as an high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane, is not a numbered lane

The HOV lane shown here should just be referred to as the “HOV Lane”

(Video) Road traffic accident management| first aid procedures|ppt for medical students

“Lane 1” would be the first general traffic lane

Lane Designation Terminology
– Recommended Lane Numbering

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HOV Lane

Lesson 2

Note that a special or unique use lane, such as an high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane, is not a numbered lane

The HOV lane shown here should just be referred to as the “HOV Lane”

“Lane 1” would be the first general traffic lane

Traffic Incident Management Area

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Advance Warning Area

Transition Area

Activity Area

Termination Area

Buffer

Space

Incident Space

Lesson 2

Animation: Click forward to make the Buffer and Incident Space labels appear

A Traffic Incident Management Area is a type of TTC zone

A Traffic Incident Management Area has four main components:

Advance Warning Area

Transition Area

Activity Area

Termination Area

The Activity Area is further comprised of a Buffer Space and an Incident Space [Click]

The parts of a Traffic Incident Management Area are covered in greater detail in Lesson 7

Note the general positioning of the responder vehicles, this will be covered more in Lesson 4

Tapers

  • At incident scenes, cones or flares used to establish a taper are typically placed no further apart in feet than the speed limit
    • 35 mph = 35' apart
    • 45 mph = 45' apart
    • 55 mph = 55' apart
    • 65 mph = 65' apart
  • An alternative guideline is to place a cone at every skip line

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Lesson 7

Channelizing devices, such as cones, are typically spaced according to the speed of the roadway

As an alternative, skip lines provide a useful guide for setting up tapers

Based on MUTCD guidance, broken lines (or skip lines) should consist of 10-foot line segments and 30-foot gaps

Lane +1 Blocking
– Protected Incident Space

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Lesson 4

Animation: Click forward for red shape to appear

Lane +1 blocking expands the protected area provided by the blocking vehicle

Lane +1 Blocking

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Lesson 4

Lane +1 blocking is used for activities related to patient loading, vehicle fires, extrication, etc.

Once active participation in these activities stops, the scene should be re-evaluated

It is possible that the additional lane or lanes originally shut down could be opened, with the blocking vehicle only blocking the involved lane(s)

Critical Wheel Angle

  • Turn front wheels of vehicles away from the incident space

(Video) Accident Investigation Training from SafetyVideos.com

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Lesson 4

When positioning a response vehicle, drivers should work on the assumption that the unit may be hit by a vehicle approaching from upstream

Turning wheels so that they are not facing the incident space is a recommended practice referred to in this course as the critical wheel angle

The critical wheel angle may help divert a struck responder vehicle away from downstream responders

Agency policy about critical wheel angle should be followed, particularly in the case of law enforcement

Linear Scene – Ambulance Struck

Video Courtesy of the Ohio Department of Public Safety and the Ohio State Highway Patrol

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Lesson 4

Video: L4_V1 - Linear Ambulance Crash.wmv

Ask/Discuss: Debrief the video

Vehicle positioning and scene security should be discussed

Blocking Vehicle Struck-By

Video Courtesy of the Mesquite Fire Department (TX)

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Lesson 4

Video: L4_V2 - TX Struck-By.wmv

Video from Mesquite Texas where a motor vehicle crash was being worked by responders

Fire apparatus was providing a protective block

Fire crew had just entered their vehicle and were preparing to depart

Dash cam from the law enforcement vehicle at the scene that was providing advance warning

Student Activity

Video Courtesy of the City of Dayton (OH)

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Lesson 7

Video: L7_V1 - OH Struck-By.wmv

Ask/Discuss: Debrief the video

As an introduction to this lesson, discuss the importance of using traffic control devices to establish a Traffic Incident Management Area

Law enforcement dash cam video of a single vehicle crash in Dayton, OH

March of 2013 at approximately 5:30 am, icy roads led to multiple crashes on US 35

A fire crew is on the scene, as is another law enforcement vehicle on the inside shoulder in the opposite direction

Captain Barry Cron narrowly avoided a secondary crash and while he was checking on the victim, a third vehicle struck the second vehicle and threw him 20 feet away

Captain Cron suffered 3 broken ribs and a broken leg, but was thankful to be alive

Zero Buffer Struck-By

Video Courtesy of the Florida Highway Patrol

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Lesson 4

Video: L4_V4 - FL Zero Buffer.wmv

A Florida Highway Patrol trooper is conducting a traffic stop, executing a driver’s side approach

The driver of the passing vehicle was running late for the airport and panicked when he saw traffic ahead slowing

Ask/Discuss: Debrief the video

      • Notice the distance from the edge line

Zero Buffer Struck-By

Video Courtesy of the Tennessee Highway Patrol

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Lesson 4

Video: L4_V3 - TN Zero Buffer.wmv

A Tennessee Highway Patrol trooper was required to move his seat organizer from the front to the rear to accommodate a rookie

At the scene of an accident, it was necessary to obtain forms requiring he place himself in the zero buffer

Ask/Discuss: Debrief the video

Avoiding the Zero Buffer

(Video) Expanding Traffic Incident Management TIM Training to the Volunteer Firefighter/EMT Community

Video Courtesy of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)

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Lesson 4

Video: L4_V5 - Avoiding Zero Buffer.wmv

Ask/Discuss: Debrief the video

Highlight the Trooper’s situational awareness and the need to have an escape route

Advance Warning Considerations
– Limited Sight Distances

  • Additional advance warning may also be necessary due to limited sight distance
    • Hills, curves, bridges, intersections, etc.
    • Smoke, fog, darkness, etc.

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Lesson 7

Animation: Click forward to make second picture appear

Another advance warning adjustment consideration involves limited sight distance

A small elevation or curvature in the roadway can obstruct a driver’s view, as can smoke, fog, and darkness

Once it has been determined the incident is a limited sight distance situation:

Position your vehicle further upstream of the scene than normal to serve as advance warning and keep your lights on

Contact other responding units and advise them of the exact location and request they position for extended advanced warning

Setup temporary warning and traffic control with available cones and signs

A “Routine” Incident – Aftermath

Photo Courtesy of the Lionville Fire Company (PA)

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Lesson 1

As the responders were working at the incident scene, an18-wheeler topped the hill, saw the incident, and attempted to change lanes

The driver lost control and flipped the rig on to its side

The vehicle slid down the hill and slammed into the unprotected incident scene just as the patient was being loaded into the ambulance

Several responder vehicles, including the fire engine and the ambulance where the patient was being loaded, were struck

A “Routine” Incident – Aftermath

  • Eight firefighters and two EMTs were struck by the 18-wheeler as it slid into the incident scene
    • One firefighter killed
    • Nine other responders
      seriously injured

Photo Courtesy of the Lionville Fire Company (PA)

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Lesson 1

Eight firefighters and two EMTs were struck by the 18-wheeler as it slid into the incident scene

One firefighter was killed and nine other responders seriously injured

Vehicle Fire Case Study

Video Courtesy of Charlotte County, FL

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Lesson 8

Video: L8_V2 - FL Vehicle Fire.wmv

Incident details are as follows:

Volvo sedan has caught fire and is positioned along the right shoulder of the highway

The engine compartment is fully involved

The fire department engine company positions in the same lane of traffic but facing the opposing direction and obstructed by smoke from the vehicle

Explain that the explosion that occurs is the energy-absorbing bumper piston from the vehicle’s front bumper

This video underscores how critical it is to keep personnel out of the danger zone directly in front of or directly behind a burning vehicle

Vehicle Fires

Video Courtesy of the Minnesota Department of Transportation

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Lesson 8

Video: L8_V1 - MN Minivan Fire.wmv

This video highlights the potential dangers encountered at vehicle fires and the need for shutting down additional lanes during vehicle fires

The first traffic camera perspective shows a burning minivan on the right shoulder of the highway; well involved in fire

(Video) Talking TIM Traffic Incident Management Webinar Series

This is an older Ford minivan with a plastic-type fuel tank

The second traffic camera view is of the same scene from the opposing direction

Lateral Buffer Space

  • If lateral buffer space requires part of a lane, close that lane – avoid partial closures

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Lesson 7

Lateral buffer space is the area between the incident space and the adjacent travel lane

Lateral buffer space can be beneficial because it allows for more room for responders to work

Lateral buffer space can be accommodated through the use of Lane +1 blocking

Partial lane closures are not recommended because they can confuse drivers and decrease scene safety (photo example)

Initial/Windshield Size-Up

  • Scene Size Up
    • Initial Radio Report (skill sheet)
    • “CAN Report”
      • Conditions, Actions, Needs
      • “CRASH” Report

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Lesson 3

On arrival we must do a Size Up on every traffic incident:

Blue Card terminology “CAN” report; conditions, actions and needs

Initial Radio Reports

4H-

Officer give an IRR

FF give a CRASH report

AO describe scene safety actions

Officer give follow up report “CAN”

Initial Radio Reports

4H-

Officer give an IRR

FF give a CRASH report

AO describe scene safety actions

Officer give follow up report “CAN”

Initial Radio Reports

4H-

Officer give an IRR

FF give a CRASH report

AO describe scene safety actions

Officer give follow up report “CAN”

Initial Radio Report

4H-

Officer give an IRR

FF give a CRASH report

AO describe scene safety actions

Officer give follow up report “CAN”

MVA Operations & Communication

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Table Top Exercises

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(Video) Incident Command System Scenario Training

Videos

1. 36.Create Automated Safety Dashboard-Excel links to Powerpoint
(Softgram)
2. Using Sysmon to Improve your Incident Response and Threat Hunting Capabilities
(FIRST)
3. An Introduction to Freeway Incident Management
(Ohio LTAP Center)
4. The Simple Solution to Traffic
(CGP Grey)
5. Safety Attitudes at Work
(Sentis)
6. Expanding Traffic Incident Management TIM Training to the Towing & Recovery Personnel Community
(NOCoE)

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